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Asia-Pacific Trade, Cultural Flows,
and Social Dynamics:

A Symposium in Anticipation of the
2011 APEC Summit in Honolulu

Casa Loma Room, University of Redlands, Redlands, CA
September 24, 2011

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Presenters’ Bios (in order of presentation)

Haider Khan

Haider Khan
Haider Khan is Professor of Economics at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies, University of Denver. He has been an adviser and consultant for many governments around the world and for international organizations including the World Bank, United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), and Asian Development Bank Institute (ADBI). Among his many publications are Global Markets and Financial Crisis: Asia’s Mangled Miracle (2004) and Innovation and Growth in East Asia: The Future of Miracles (2004).
Gerald Groshek Gerald Groshek is Professor of International Economics and Business at the School of Business, University of Redlands. His teaching and research have been informed both by practical experience in international banking and foreign exchange trading and by residencies at various foreign institutions, including Fulbright-funded visits in Slovakia and Ukraine. Groshek’s publications include research on investment climate efficiency in Chinese cities and special economic zones in India.

Hong Zhang

Hong Zhang

Hong Zhang is Associate Professor and Department Chair of East Asian Studies at Colby College where she teaches both Chinese language and Chinese culture courses. A Chinese anthropologist whose research interests range from rural marriage patterns and family dynamics to migrant workers and urbanization, Zhang has most recently published on family life and gender issues among Chinese migrant workers, the emergence of Chinese labor NGOs, the decline of family-based eldercare in China.

Sawa Kurotani

Sawa Kurotani
Sawa Kurotani is Associate Professor of Anthropology at the College of Arts and Sciences, University of Redlands. Her book Home Away from Home: Japanese Corporate Wives in the United States (2005) integrates her diverse interests in globalization, gender issues, and Japanese culture, while her current research focuses on the Japanese salarywoman, along with an expanding interest into the realms of popular culture and popular music. Kurotani also writes a monthly column in English for Daily Yomiuri, a leading Japanese newspaper.

Jeffrey Wasserstrom

Jeffrey Wasserstrom
Jeffrey Wasserstrom is Chair of the History Department at the University of California, Irvine, and editor of The Journal of Asian Studies. As public intellectual he regularly contributes to newspapers and general interest magazines, such as Foreign Policy and Time. A co-founder of the popular blog The China Beat, his many publications include China in the 21st Century: What Everyone Needs to Know (2010) and the forthcoming co-edited anthology Chinese Characters: Fast-Changing Lives in a Fast-Changing Land (2012).
Carol Brash Carol Brash is Assistant Professor in Art and Asian Studies at the College of Saint Benedict|St. John’s University. Her classes include: Introduction to Asian Art, China in Focus: The History of Photography in China, 1850-Present, East Asian Gardens, and Modern and Contemporary Art. Her research interests are: representations of gardens in the Ming dynasty, Chinese gardens outside of China, photography in China, contemporary Asian art, and memory and identity in art.

Stanley Rosen

Stanley Rosen
Stanley Rosen is Professor of Political Science at the University of Southern California, and Director of its East Asian Studies Center from August of 2005 through August of 2011. His research ranges from Chinese youth and the state to Chinese cinema and society. An award-winning classroom teacher, Rosen’s most recent publications are two co-edited volumes: Chinese Politics: State, Society and the Market (2010) and Art, Politics and Commerce in Chinese Cinema (2010).
Yunxiang Yan

Yunxiang Yan
Yunxiang Yan is Professor of Anthropology and co-director of the UCLA Center for Chinese Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles. His research interests include cultural globalization, social change and development, and the individual-society relationship. Yan is the winner of a Guggenheim fellowship in 2010, and the author of The Individualization of Chinese Society (2009), Private Life under Socialism: Love, Intimacy, and Family Change in a Chinese Village, 1949-1999 (2003), and many other publications.

Contact Robert Y. Eng, symposium coordinator

© 2011 University of Redlands