Installing East Asian Language Support Under Microsoft Windows

 

Installing East Asian Language Support Under Windows 2000 Professional

This page outlines the steps for installing East Asian languages on a computer running Windows 2000 Professional so that the user can both read and write in them. For Windows XP and Windows Vista, please see the page on how to enable East Asian languages on Windows XP and Windows Vista respectively, since the steps are somewhat different. Windows 95/98/Me/NT4 users have to download Asian language support and input editor files from Microsoft's Web site.

  1. First open the Control Panel dialog box by clicking on the Start button, moving the mouse to Settings and click on Control Panel.



    Then double click on Regional Options to open its dialog box.

  2. Under the General tab in the Regional Options dialog box, check the languages you want supported (Japanese; Korean; Simplified Chinese; and/or Traditional Chinese) by clicking in the checkbox next to those languages listed under Language settings for the system. You may need to scroll down to see the language options you want. You may be prompted for a Windows 2000 Professional CD-ROM.



  3. Next, click on the tab for Input Locales, and then add the language input options you want by clicking on the Change... button under Input Languages and Methods.



  4. If you have used certain input methods before, you will probably want to choose those if they are available in Microsoft's menus. For Japanese the only choice besides Japanese keyboard is MS-IME 2000 (IME stands for Input Method Editor). For traditional and simplified Chinese, there are many choices. If you are comfortable with the Pinyin romanization system for Chinese, you may want to choose Chinese (Simplified) - MS-Pinyin98. Note that MS-Pinyin98 allows toggling between traditional and simplified Chinese input, and so if you want to be able to write both traditional and simplified characters you may not need to install a traditional Chinese input option in addition.

    The next 3 sections illustrate the installation of this input editor. For installing Japanese MS-IME 2000 (which in its default setting allows the writing of kana and kanji by Romaji input), skip to section (8). I have not provided examples here for installing Korean and Traditional Chinese language input, but the steps should be similar to those for installing Japanese and Simplified Chinese.

  5. After you have clicked the Change button in the Input Locales tab as outlined in section (3), you get the Add Input Language dialogue box. Choose Chinese (PRC) from the drop-down list under Input Language, check the Keyboard Layout / IME button, and then pick Chinese (Simplified) - MS-PinYin 98. Then click OK.



  6. You are now back to the Text Services dialog box. Note that under Chinese (PRC) /Keyboard, Chinese (Simplified) - MS-PinYin 98 is now listed. Click Apply and then OK.



  7. After you have installed Chinese (Simplified) - MS-Pinyin98 input editor, you may want to fine tune its properties. To do this, first select Chinese (Simplified) - MS-Pinyin98 under Services in the Text Services dialog box by clicking on and highlighting it. Then click on Properties to bring up the Properties dialog box for MS-Pinyin98.

    For new users, it is strongly recommended that be checked (if it is not checked by default) and that the other default options be left in place. A prompt line interface will then be available to allow easy choice of the correct Chinese character(s) for the pinyin romanization just entered. (An explanation of how this prompt line interface works is found on the page for writing Chinese under Windows 2000 Professional.) Experienced users will want to pick and choose their options.



  8. This and the next 2 sections explain how to install Japanese MS-IME 2000. Start by clicking on on the Change button under Input Languages and Methods while you are in the Input Locales tab of the Regional Options dialog box, as in section (3). Then you get the Add Input Language dialogue box. Choose Japanese from the drop-down list under Input Language, check the Keyboard Layout / IME button, and then pick Japanese Input System (MS-IME 2000). Then click OK.



  9. You are now back to the Text Services dialog box. Note that under Japanese / Keyboard, Japanese Input System (MS-IME 2000) is now listed. Click Apply and then OK.



  10. After you have installed Japanese MS-IME 2000, you may want to fine tune its properties. To do this, first select Japanese Input System (MS-IME 2000) under Services in the Text Services dialog box by clicking on and highlighting it. Then click on Properties to bring up the Properties dialog box for MS-IME 2000. Experienced users will want to pick and choose their options. For new users, it is strongly recommended that the default options be left in place.



  11. VoilĂ ! You are now ready to both read and write Chinese and/or Japanese in your documents. You will see on the right hand side of the taskbar at the bottom of the Windows desktop the Language bar button , which allows users to change the input language in an application by left clicking on it to bring up the language choices available and then selecting and clicking the desired language. Note that within the same document you can change the input language by using the Language button. You can produce a document with a mixture of different languages.



  12. New users may want to take a look at the pages for writing Chinese and Japanese to get started quickly with working with Chinese and/or Japanese in their documents. Please see also the overview on reading and writing e-mail in Chinese and Japanese.

Please e-mail me your comments, suggestions, and corrections.


Univ. of Redlands     Asian Studies Program     Asian Studies Resources

All contents copyright 2002-2007 Robert Y. Eng
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